Monthly Archives: December 2014

The Deer Stars (Postcard Pitch)

A couple of years ago, I learned about something called “Postcard Pitching” at a writing event.  This is where you condense your idea for a story into few enough words for it to fit on the back of a postcard.  I’ve decided to do this for a series of stories (aimed at children of 8-11) that I’ve started to write and hope to get published.  It’s somewhat appropriate for this time of year, so here goes.

Far, far away in space lies the mystical world of Uto.  Its home star, Sapienta Centauri, is the source of all intelligence in the galaxy and Uto’s rulers, the Guardians of Wisdom, have been its protectors for millions of years.

Now the Guardians face a new and terrifying threat.  The cruel tyrant Arctos, ruler of the planet Vargul, seeks to claim Sapienta Centauri for his own and gain untold power over all the lifeforms in the galaxy.

Seeking a new ally in their fight against this threat, the Guardians of Wisdom turn to Earth.  There eight reindeer who you all know of are tired of their old life.  The Guardians take them to Uto, give them new bodies, knowledge and training.  Once there to serve all the children on Earth, they now protect not only them, but all children in the galaxy.  They are…

THE DEER STARS!!!

When Life Gives You Lemon Sharks (Flash Fiction)

This story won me 1st prize in a Flash Fiction competition, on the theme of “sharks”!  I’m very pleased with that and I hope you enjoy it.

“Bull, blue, tiger, thresher, great white…”

Paul was five years old and had Asperger’s Syndrome.  He adored making lists and was full of curious information.

“Nurse, whale, hammerhead, six-gill, sandtiger…”

His grandparents listened, bewildered, to the words he pealed out, as he sat on their lounge carpet.

“Whatever is he saying, Dear?” chuckled his grandmother.

“Paul has memorised the name of every kind of shark there is, Mum,” explained his mother Lorna.  He’s always reciting their names.”

“Wobbegong, porbeagle, goblin, megamouth…”

“Okay now, Paul,” said his father Patrick, “Stop a moment so I can talk to Granny and Granddad.”

But Paul was not to be dissuaded.  “And megalodon!” he shrieked with delight.  “It’s extinct, but it was eighteen metres long!  As big as a bus!”

“Alright, Paul, I’m sure this mega-donna thing was terrifying,” said Lorna, kneeling down so she could look her son in the eyes.  “But I have some very important news to tell Granny and Granddad, so please be quiet a moment.”

Paul nodded vigorously and grinned hugely, to show he understood.  Lorna rose to her feet.

“OK Mum, Dad, what I wanted to tell you…”

“Oh, I know!” shouted Paul, leaping to his feet.  “Lemon shark!”

He pointed fiercely at his mother.  All the adults were taken aback.

“Paul, don’t interrupt or point like that.  It’s rude,” chided Patrick.

“But Dad, lemon shark,” Paul said insistently, jabbing his finger.

“What do you mean, Paul?” asked his grandfather.  “That’s not a shark, that’s your Mummy.”

“No, there, Granddad!  Lemon shark, lemon shark!”

It was only then that Patrick realised Paul was pointing at Lorna’s belly.

“But of course,” he said, his tone softer and quieter.  He put his arms around Lorna and kissed her on the hair.  “Paul recently found out that lemon sharks give birth to live young.”

Lorna’s parents’ faces lit up.  They scarcely dared to hope what Patrick and Lorna might say.

“Well,” laughed Lorna, “This wasn’t quite how I imagined breaking the news I was pregnant again, but there you are!”

Lorna’s parents’ faces lit up.  They scarcely dared to hope what Patrick and Lorna might say.

“Well,” laughed Lorna, “This wasn’t quite how I imagined breaking the news I was pregnant again, but there you are!”